Poll: Should Turkey join the EU?
This poll is closed.
Yes
38.33%
23 38.33%
No
61.67%
37 61.67%
Total 60 vote(s) 100%
* You voted for this item. [Show Results]

Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Should Turkey join the EU?
#51
Mata Hari Wrote:YES why not and whole Europe will be Islamic soon, plus now it has a ace, ''NABUCCO" let turkey join it and ur as* won't be frozen, if russians cut it!!!
Just put an end to your delirium.
Every passing hour brings the Solar System forty-three thousand miles closer to Globular Cluster M13 in Hercules - and still there are some misfits who insist that there is no such thing as progress.
Reply
#52
Kusnetsov Wrote:
Mata Hari Wrote:YES why not and whole Europe will be Islamic soon, plus now it has a ace, ''NABUCCO" let turkey join it and ur as* won't be frozen, if russians cut it!!!
Just put an end to your delirium.


Delirium? We are not the nation of drunks like the Russia. Thank you for shut down gas to EU!! Now sure we will be in EU.! Maybe we dont like everything about EU and U.S. but we like them for one big reason: they better than Russia. China not trust you either. Ask self --why all civilized world hate you? You destroy only. Never build. Even you people most poor, worst than Turkey. Shame! You always take. Never give. so thank you for shut down gas to EU!!! Listen to America song - "Be Happy!" Go get drunk. Get delirium! :mrgreen:
Reply
#53
You are wrong Ankara, actually EU is probably the most trustful region in the world. Don't be angry on us, we are just different from you, and we think you should live apart in regions: us - EU and you - Turkey
"I believe in making the world safe for our children, but not our children's children, because I don't think children should be having sex." Smile

Web Design Forums - Server-Side Web and Software Development discussions
Reply
#54
turkey should be very careful of what they are doing. it is no longer "joining up", but handing your sovereignty to an unelected dictatorship. Personally I will never submit to EU rule, and am prepared to put my life down to protect my country from this evil.
Reply
#55
If Turkey joins EU, I will support the idea that my country comes out of this union. I want my traditions to remain unchanged. I love my country and, honestly, wouldn't like to live in one union with Turks, because their culture is different from mine.
“The only thing worse than being talked about is not being talked about.”
A really nice forum for Parisians
Reply
#56
Turkey already has received numerous grants from the European Union. If it is not going to join it, what for these grants were offered?
Reply
#57
Faw_Peter Wrote:Turkey already has received numerous grants from the European Union. If it is not going to join it, what for these grants were offered?

Well, Europe has other interests against Turkey, rather important than its joining. Europe wants the neighbour countries to be at a, more or less, civilized level, since many Turks look for job in EU.
If a kid asks where rain comes from, I think a cute thing to tell him is "God is crying." And if he asks why God is crying, another cute thing to tell him is "Probably because of something you did."

Vegan news | Vegan forums
Reply
#58
Benn Wrote:
Faw_Peter Wrote:Turkey already has received numerous grants from the European Union. If it is not going to join it, what for these grants were offered?

Well, Europe has other interests against Turkey, rather important than its joining. Europe wants the neighbour countries to be at a, more or less, civilized level, since many Turks look for job in EU.
yes, but it has now ended. Many governments of many countries impose restrictions for private companies in hiring immigrants. UK is the main example.
Reply
#59
Remember that even when the European economy was perfect, the EU countries still had certain regulations that protected mainly local workers. The introduced restrictions are only official, on papers, while illegal immigration keeps persisting and thereby - illegal employment.
Reply
#60
Faw_Peter Wrote:Remember that even when the European economy was perfect, the EU countries still had certain regulations that protected mainly local workers. The introduced restrictions are only official, on papers, while illegal immigration keeps persisting and thereby - illegal employment.

Peter, the tougher these regulations become, the more will the employer think when hiring that illegal or even legal immigrant. If you were to run a famous company, would you risk paying a 20,000 euros fine for hiring a foreign worker?
"I believe in making the world safe for our children, but not our children's children, because I don't think children should be having sex." Smile

Web Design Forums - Server-Side Web and Software Development discussions
Reply
#61
Steven Wrote:
Faw_Peter Wrote:Remember that even when the European economy was perfect, the EU countries still had certain regulations that protected mainly local workers. The introduced restrictions are only official, on papers, while illegal immigration keeps persisting and thereby - illegal employment.

Peter, the tougher these regulations become, the more will the employer think when hiring that illegal or even legal immigrant. If you were to run a famous company, would you risk paying a 20,000 euros fine for hiring a foreign worker?

Steve, companies make economies of millions due to hiring cheap labour force, since it's one of the three main capital factors. And what is a fee of 20,000 euros in comparison with those profits they gain? Nothing!
If a kid asks where rain comes from, I think a cute thing to tell him is "God is crying." And if he asks why God is crying, another cute thing to tell him is "Probably because of something you did."

Vegan news | Vegan forums
Reply
#62
EU considers that Turkey has to "Substantially improve respect for the rights of non-Muslim religious communities to meet European standards." I don't thin it's possible. Religion is something unchangeable.
“Love is like a booger. You keep picking at it until you get it, then wonder what to do with it.”
3ds Max tutorials | Light Wave 3d tutorials | MAYA tutorials | XSI tutorials
Reply
#63
European court fines Turkey in Greek Orthodox case

<!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.reuters.com/article/worldNews/idUSTRE5224XF20090303">http://www.reuters.com/article/worldNew ... XF20090303</a><!-- m -->

<!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://europenews.dk/en/node/20661">http://europenews.dk/en/node/20661</a><!-- m -->

<!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://groong.usc.edu/news/msg260383.html">http://groong.usc.edu/news/msg260383.html</a><!-- m -->
Reply
#64
It's again a proof that they disrespect others' spiritual rights and religion. Greek Orthodox Patriarchate has filed over 20 law suits in the European Court of Human Rights. There is no other entity that had those amounts of suits with the European justice.
If a kid asks where rain comes from, I think a cute thing to tell him is "God is crying." And if he asks why God is crying, another cute thing to tell him is "Probably because of something you did."

Vegan news | Vegan forums
Reply
#65
No No No, Look at how many problems the Turks caused us Europeans in the Past :

1) Ottoman invasion of Greece,Balkans and Austria(15th, 16th centuries)
2) Great Siege of Malta(1565) - Ottomans vs Knight of St. John, Maltese, Spanish, Greeks and Italians
3) Continued Ottoman - Hapsburg wars
4) WW1 atrocities(Armenian and Kurd genocides)
5) Conflict in Cyprus
6) Recent conficts

And these are just from my knowladge, there are probably much more

And ok I understand that's all past, but historical grievances are a factor on the opinion of a country.
Even so, Muslims disrespect some vital human rights and Turkey is not an exception
I also think that Turkey's economy is not yet stable for EU membership and integration will lead to thousands of Turk immigrants to the West

So my vote...NO

Speaking of votes, the EU member countries should hold a referendum so EU citizens will have the right to choose if Turkey should enter the EU
Reply
#66
I think Turkey has every right to join the EU. I even think it is better for EU and for Turkey.
When Turkey joins the EU,then Turkey will be a richer country in time. So there will not be as much Turks moving to another EU country as there were. Also Turkey will be a more Economic and Political stabil country,after they joined the EU. It's actually a win-win situation,I think.

But after Turkey ( ánd Croatia !) joined,whe should stop expanding and just concentrate for 5 years orso to what's happening inside the EU. I think they are not doing that as good as it should be.
Just 5 years no expanding,just searching solutions for problems that are now inside the EU.
Reply
#67
why not....
Reply
#68
I find Turkey (and particularly the Turks) far less objectionable than a couple of the member states that we´ve already accepted. ;( I believe that Turkey would be an excellent asset to the Union. Smile
Reply
#69
Powerslave Wrote:No No No, Look at how many problems the Turks caused us Europeans in the Past :

1) Ottoman invasion of Greece,Balkans and Austria(15th, 16th centuries)
2) Great Siege of Malta(1565) - Ottomans vs Knight of St. John, Maltese, Spanish, Greeks and Italians
3) Continued Ottoman - Hapsburg wars
4) WW1 atrocities(Armenian and Kurd genocides)
5) Conflict in Cyprus
6) Recent conficts

And these are just from my knowladge, there are probably much more

And ok I understand that's all past, but historical grievances are a factor on the opinion of a country.
Even so, Muslims disrespect some vital human rights and Turkey is not an exception
I also think that Turkey's economy is not yet stable for EU membership and integration will lead to thousands of Turk immigrants to the West

So my vote...NO

Speaking of votes, the EU member countries should hold a referendum so EU citizens will have the right to choose if Turkey should enter the EU

well,then why is Germany part of EU?

It's the same like we say ;

well Germany killed thousands of jews in WW2,so they caused the EU states trouble and are therefore not allowed to join EU. So the '' facts '' that you gave and which make your opinion is not right. Germany did a lot of bad things in the past. The Netherlands did maybe too,as well as almost every country in the world has made some bad choices in the past. I mean,you are talking about things which happened in 1565 :quoi SO WHAT?! we live in 2009 !

Religion does not matter. All Turkey has to do is stop recognizing Turkish-Cyprus and improve human rights. Then I think they are ready to join the EU.
Reply
#70
Dutch91 Wrote:
Powerslave Wrote:No No No, Look at how many problems the Turks caused us Europeans in the Past :
......

well,then why is Germany part of EU?
.... you are talking about things which happened in 1565 SO WHAT?! we live in 2009 !

Religion does not matter. ....
Bravo, Dutch 91! Confuseduper
Reply
#71
As a Turk who lived in his childhood 7 years in Germany and travelled most of the European countries I am abolutely against that Turkey enters the EU:
First of all Turkey will loose all its attractiveness and its values and culture etc. if it enters the EU. Second, it will be as expensive as Greece if it will enter the EU while it is a very cheap country now. Third, people will become robots like the people in the EU which we Turks never want. Forth EU needs Turkey, Turkey does not need the EU. And last, do you know how many Americans, Europeans, Chinese, Japanese, Greeks, Armenians and people of other very different nations prefer to live in Turkey? (They also do not want that Turkey enters the EU because of above mentioned reasons). Just read this (I can present here lots of articles written by foreigners living in Turkey just as this one below and I can present you a foreigner in Istanbul in Turkey of which every nationality you do want) :

Living in the Side area of Turkey
Posted March 14th, 2009 by turktelTurkey
British expat Terry thought of moving to Turkey because it had what she wanted and needed to enjoy her early retirement. It's a decision she has not regretted. Here, she tells us what life is like for her as a foreigner in an area called Side, gives some tips on the cost of living and housing, and shares advice for those planning to live in Turkey.

Terry White


-Where were you born?

Chelmsford, Essex, England


-In which country and city are you living now?

Turkey, Side, near Antalya


-Are you living alone or with your family?

Alone


-How long have you been living in Turkey?

3 years

-What is your age?

58

-When did you come up with the idea of living in Turkey?

Spent months in the UK looking for somewhere for early retirement. Looked at all the usual places such as Spain, France, Cyprus, etc., and in the end it came down to 3 important factors. Firstly property prices, secondly weather and thirdly proximity of airport with regular flights back to the UK should I need to get there in an emergency. Side has 300 days of sunshine a year, the airport is only a 45 minute drive away and property prices are still one of the cheapest in and around Europe. I saw it as an ideal investment opportunity especially when Turkey becomes a member of the EU as property prices will inevitably soar.


-Was it hard to get a visa or a work permit?

Of course if you are making regular trips back to your mother country you can just use the visa which is payable at the point of entry every 3 months. However if not then residents visas are very easy to obtain and are available for one, two, three or five years. If you intend having a landline telephone or want to buy a car then you must have a resident's visa first.


-Was it difficult for you to get medical insurance before you went there or when you first arrived?

Private medical insurance is readily available through several companies but it doesn't come cheap!


-How do you make your living in Turkey? Do you have any type of income generated?
Retired, so live off company pension, which is easy to do as cost of living is so low.

-Do you speak Turkish and do you think it's important to speak the local language? Please add your thoughts on local customs and whether it's important for expats to respect/observe local customs.
Yes, it's important to learn the local language which after 3 years I am still struggling with. As Side is a holiday resort then most of the local people speak either English or German and whilst it is important to respect local customs these are very few and far between until you venture out into the villages.


-Do you miss home and family sometimes?

Yes, of course I miss my son and daughter who live in the UK but they visit 2 or 3 times a year and we have regular telephone contact. Do I miss the UK? No, not at all and have only been back once in 3 years and on that visit it only confirmed why I wanted to leave in the first place. Quality of life is so much better here without the rat race and all the materialistic things that people in the UK seem so intent on.


-Do you have other plans for the future?

My main goal at the moment is to see much more of Turkey and just enjoy my early retirement.


-What about housing, have you bought, or are you renting a home? How much do you pay for it?

I have bought a 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom duplex property on a small development of only 6 homes (the other 5 being just holiday homes) with a communal garden and swimming pool within a 20 minute walk to the beaches and the Old Town. Restaurants and shops are within a 5 minute walk so the location is ideal. I paid £79,000 for this property 3 years ago so expect to pay about £90,000 for a comparable property now but it is a luxury property and included air conditioning throughout and all white goods including dishwasher in the kitchen. A 2 bedroom 1 bathroom apartment in this area would now cost from £50,000 upwards with a pool and expect to pay between £30 -40 per month for maintenance.

-What is the cost of living in Turkey?

I usually tell people that a couple can live comfortably on about £800 per month including all bills.

-What do you think about the Turk?

The locals are superb and always ready to help and be prepared to spend many hours chatting over a cup of tea. In 3 years I have never heard anyone complain about foreigners living here and they really do welcome you with open arms. They are also very keen to learn English.

-What are the positive and negative aspects of living in Turkey?

Positive aspects include quality of life, relaxed atmosphere, excellent weather, no air pollution, excellent transport links to other cities within Turkey and of course Antlaya International airport from where you can easily fly to any other destination. Cost of living and very friendly locals are another plus.

Negative aspects - this is a difficult one as I cannot really think of any. Small things really like shopping - whilst you can get most things here it takes a lot longer to find them than it would at home and sometimes involves a lot of travelling around to find exactly what you are looking for. (not a problem in the larger cities). One other thing that takes some getting used to because the people are so laid back is punctuality! Do not be suprised to find a tradesman turning up 6 hours later than the appointment time. Patience is the key!!

-Do you have any tips for our readers about living in Turkey?

1. Learn the language

2. Do not compare everything with how it is back home.

3. Keep an open mind

4. Research carefully before importing belongings from home into Turkey as the facts given on some websites are in fact not correct as regards what they will tax you on. It appears to depend on the day!

-
Reply
#72
Turkey should join the European Union. Turkey has proven that her economy has more stability than some EU-member states. Turkey is one of the few countries who didn't had to inject billions of euro's into banks and other financial companies.

Turkey has every right to become member of the European Union. The arguments which say that Turkey should not be an EU-member state because it is not situated in Europe,can be swept away,because Cyprus also isn't situated in Europe,but in Asia. The argument which say that Turkey should not be in the EU because their economy is under-developed,can also be swept away,because Turkey is member of the G20 and because she is one of the few countries which are not hit that hard by the economical/financial crisis.

But still,if I'm honoust,Turkey has a long road to go. Turkey should not acknowledge North-Cyrpus as an independent state,but as part of the island Cyprus. Everyone in Turkey,no matter what their religion, skin-color,sexual preference,political preference or origin is,as well as there should be no differences in treatments between male and females,is equal and has the same rights.

We also must acknowledge,that an European Union without Turkey,will not be as powerfull as it is with Turkey,and espacially in the middle-east. So can we now,finally,move faster towards Turkish membership?
Reply
#73
Should Turkey be allowed entry to the EU?

Simple.

No if’s –

No but’s -

No way.
Reply
#74
i don't think Turkey should join the EU,Turkr\ey people are living very well today .
Reply
#75
I voted 'yes' to Turkey joining the EU. The reason is simple: I want the EU to collapse in spectacular style. My hatred of the EU is only matched by my hatred of the UN.
Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  do you think that Iceland will join EU soon ?? chris 0 923 Less than 1 minute ago
Last Post:



Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)