Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
How to safeguard your money as you travel
#1
Want to share some information I found for travelers.

How to safeguard your money as you travel

As the summer travel season approaches, it's a good time to review the financial rules of the road. Consumers who take a few precautions before they leave home can help ensure that their cash and credit cards are safe and secure, whether their trips take them to a nearby state or overseas.
"We don't want to be alarmist, because people can run into problems in their own neighborhoods, too," said Nancy Dunnan, publisher of tourism website in New York. "But losses can be much harder to deal with if you're away from home and you don't know the local procedures or, sometimes, the local language."
Dunnan said the first thing people need to do is limit what they carry with them. In most cases, she recommends no more than two credit cards -- one for regular use and the other for backup -- or one credit card and one debit card for cash withdrawals.
"It helps to notify the card issuers you'll be traveling, so they don't put a hold on the card when they start seeing charges from an unfamiliar place," Dunnan said. "And you should double check your limits so you don't go over the top."
Don't Miss
• In Depth: Travel Companion
Dunnan also recommends families carry traveler's checks. Although the availability of automated teller machines, or ATMs, has made traveler's checks less essential, they remain a good source of cash if credit or debit cards are lost or stolen.
"The amount (of traveler's checks) you need depends on the length of the trip," she said. "But it doesn't hurt to have anywhere from $250 to $500 to get you through a difficult time."
For those traveling abroad, it can be a good idea to buy in advance the equivalent of $100 in the currency of the country you're visiting. That way, you can cover taxi fares, porters' tips and other expenses you may incur before you have time to change money.
How you carry money and credit cards around affects your security, said Sarah Schlichter, editor of another site for travellers, based in Pennington, New Jersey.
Schlichter, an ardent traveler abroad, keeps her credit cards and dollars "in a money belt under my clothes." Then, she said, she puts the equivalent of $100 in local currency in a cheap, plastic wallet that she keeps in her pocket.
"That way, when I'm pulling out my wallet, I'm only exposing a limited amount of local currency," which presumably is less attractive to a thief than a large amount of dollars, she said.
Schlichter also said people need to stay aware of their surroundings, both at home and abroad.
"You have to use common sense," she said. "There are thieves and pickpockets in New York City -- just the way there are in Rome."
That means choosing ATMs inside banks or in hotel lobbies and "not in a dark, creepy alley," she said.
Schlichter suggests couples or friends traveling together split their cards and cash so that if one is robbed or loses something, the other has backup resources.
For those who don't have access to a hotel safe, it's a good idea to keep your money, main credit card, passport and airline tickets on your person at all times. Your backup card should be kept somewhere else that's safe. This is especially true for those sleeping in hostels or traveling on crowded trains or ferries, she said.
"The last place you want to carry everything is in a purse or backpack," she cautioned, saying they were the target of many thieves. "If you find yourself in a crowded place, keep your bag in front of you with your arms over it."
The U.S. State Department, which has travel safety tips on its site at <!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://travel.state.gov">http://travel.state.gov</a><!-- m -->, suggests travelers leave behind "anything you would hate to lose," including valuable jewelry, irreplaceable family objects, your Social Security card, library card and other membership cards you're unlikely to need.
If you're headed overseas and are carrying a passport for identification, you might consider leaving your driver's license behind if you're not going to be driving yourself, and you likely won't need credit cards from hometown retail stores either.
Both Schlichter and Dunnan urge travelers to make a list of everything in their wallet and photocopies of other important travel documents, such as plane tickets and passport and traveler's checks. Don't list full credit and debit card numbers, but the phone numbers to contact if the cards are lost or stolen.
Carry one copy in a safe place, away from the cards and documents themselves, and leave another back home with a friend, relative or colleague in case of emergencies, they said.
Reply
#2
the best way ti safeguard your money is not to spend them on girls when travelling :lol:
"I believe in making the world safe for our children, but not our children's children, because I don't think children should be having sex." Smile

Web Design Forums - Server-Side Web and Software Development discussions
Reply
#3
Nice article!!!
Thank you, Faw_Peter!

I would like to point out though that not all countries will accept your credit or debit cards.
Some countries in spite of having ATMs and local visa cards, can be banned by your bank.
The same is with traveler's checks in some not EU countries cashing them is a problem.
Some of the world's greatest feats were accomplished by people not smart enough to know they were impossible.
SEO directory of forums - free submission
Reply
#4
you're wrong, there are only very few countries (maybe in Africa) which can not accept a credit/debit card. As for Europe, it's 100% available
“Love is like a booger. You keep picking at it until you get it, then wonder what to do with it.”
3ds Max tutorials | Light Wave 3d tutorials | MAYA tutorials | XSI tutorials
Reply
#5
I travel a lot and I don't remember a country which would not accept my card. in some stores credit cards might not be accepted, but commercial banks and cash dispensers always accepted them.
If a kid asks where rain comes from, I think a cute thing to tell him is "God is crying." And if he asks why God is crying, another cute thing to tell him is "Probably because of something you did."

Vegan news | Vegan forums
Reply
#6
It's better to avoid countries where automatic payment systems are not used widely. It can create a lot of discomfort. Nevertheless, if we go to such a country, we should make sure that the banks can return your cash in case your credit/debit card is lost.
"I believe in making the world safe for our children, but not our children's children, because I don't think children should be having sex." Smile

Web Design Forums - Server-Side Web and Software Development discussions
Reply
#7
You need to call the bank that issued the card and make that announcement. Local banks have no sort of responsibility if the card is lost, stolen or swallowed by an ATM
Reply
#8
The best solution that works everytime is to make a conversion of a relative sum of money in your home country, in the currency of the country you're going to visit. that's all
Reply
#9
Karl.in.eu Wrote:You need to call the bank that issued the card and make that announcement. Local banks have no sort of responsibility if the card is lost, stolen or swallowed by an ATM
I'm not a bank worker, but I believe banks have concluded agreements with banks from allover the world in this matter. They simply may charge a fee for that, but it's feasible.
“Love is like a booger. You keep picking at it until you get it, then wonder what to do with it.”
3ds Max tutorials | Light Wave 3d tutorials | MAYA tutorials | XSI tutorials
Reply
#10
Well, there is a joke taken from the reality. Make pockets on your boxers :lol: that will really help. You will feel safe even while going to the toilet, because you'll know that your money is with you.
Reply
#11
The best way is to safe money on credit cards, but there are also risks to loose it because there are many offenders which can chip away your credit number and then goodbye money, but whatever it is the best way nowadays.
Reply
#12
The best is to take with you not so many money, because as much you will take as much you will spend, of course if you don't know the measure, when you should stop spending.
Reply
#13
Hello Friends.....

1.To keep your money safe when you travel, you should always use some type of money belt. These money belts are worn under the clothing and have safe zippered compartments where you can hide your credit cards, cash, and more.

2.The money and cards you expect to use shortly can be kept in your wallet. However, don't put your wallet in your purse or your back pocket where thieves can easily reach it.

Thanks
Reply
#14
To keep your money safe when traveling, do not keep money on single place instead seperate the money into different places like one portion of money in pocket, bag, friends, socks etc. Pre pay all that you can before leaving home, so you have less money and it will be so much safer with as many transactions taken care of before travel has even started. Pay with credit card since this will save you money in foreign travels.

US Visas | US Immigration Forms
Reply


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  How many money will I need to travel from Greece to Usa? Drake 0 2,422 Less than 1 minute ago
Last Post:



Users browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)